SPR Centre - Feeds and Accessories for Poultry, Domestic Pets, Horses, Ponies and Livestock

The Health Benefits of Eggs


Unfortunately in this day and age people tend to believe what the press
or social media tell them. Sadly these facts are not always right.

Here is a reminder on the benefits of eggs.

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1 Eating eggs lead to elevated levels of HDL (high density lipoprotein) the "Good Cholesterol" People who have higher levels of
      HDL usually have a lower risk of heart disease, stroke and other health problems. In one study, eating two eggs per day for 6 weeks
      increased HDL levels by 10% (Click on eggs for more info).
alt="*Highly respected database from the National Institutes of Health  egg5.jpg  egg6.jpg

2 One large egg contains 22% of the DRA of Selenium. Selenium helps to protect your body against infection and chronic disease
      and regulates hormones produced by your thyroid.

      Reduced Risk of Chronic Disease
      Selenium is a potent antioxidant. It works to prevent cell damage in your body caused by factors such as aging, lifestyle choices,
      and environmental conditions like pollution. Over time, this cell damage - or oxidative stress - is linked to cancer, heart disease,
      and cognitive decline.

      Thyroid Health
      Your thyroid is a small gland that produces hormones to regulate your body's metabolic processes. When it's not performing
      correctly - such as an under active thyroid - people may experience fatigue, weight gain, depression, and muscle aches.
      Over time, thyroid risks can contribute to chronic diseases.

      Cognitive Support

      Research shows selenium's antioxidant activity fights cell damage that may contribute to neurological diseases like Parkinson's,
      Alzheimer's, and multiple sclerosis. Studies are ongoing to determine if selenium's effects could help prevent or treat cognitive
      decline, but scientists believe getting enough in your diet can help maintain healthy brain function.

3 Eggs contain Choline - an important nutrient that most people don't get enough of. Choline is a nutrient that most people don't
      even know exists, yet it is an incredibly important substance and is often grouped with the B vitamins. Choline is used to build cell
      membranes and has a role in producing signalling molecules in the brain, along with various other functions. The symptoms of
      choline deficiency are serious, so fortunately it's rare. Whole eggs are an excellent source of choline. A single egg contains more
      than 100 mg of this very important nutrient. (click on egg for more info).
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4
One large egg contains 18% of Riboflavin, also known as vitamin B2. Riboflavin is important for growth, energy metabolism, red
      blood cell development, vision, and the healthy functioning of the nervous system. It is also an antioxidant nutrient. The human body
      is unable to store riboflavin, which makes it important to consume the Recommended Daily Intake (RDI). To make it easy, a serving
      of two eggs contains 24% of this RDI.

5Eggs contain Pantothenic Acid - commonly called vitamin B5. This plays a role in converting food into energy and breaking down
     fat. It also helps in the production of vitamin D. Though uncommon, a deficiency in vitamin B5 can result in fatigue, irritability,
     numbness, and muscle cramps, among other symptoms. A serving of two eggs gives you 22% of the RDI  of Pantothenic acid.

6 Eggs contain Vitamin B12 which is essential in the formation of red blood cells, converting food into energy, and maintaining the
      healthy function of the immune and nervous systems. Vitamin B12 deficiencies can lead to fatigue, weakness, weight loss,
      decreased appetite, dizziness, constipation, and more. The human body is incapable of making vitamin B12 on its own, making it
      essential to consume foods high in this vitamin. The recommended daily intake of B12 is about 2µg and a serving of two eggs
      fulfils 15% of this requirement. is essential in the formation of red blood cells, converting food into energy, and maintaining the
      healthy function of the immune and nervous systems. Vitamin B12 deficiencies can lead to fatigue, weakness, weight loss,
      decreased appetite, dizziness, constipation, and more. The human body is incapable of making vitamin B12 on its own, making it
      essential to consume foods high in this vitamin. The recommended daily intake of B12 is about 2µg and a serving of two eggs fulfils
      15% of this requirement.

7 Eggs contain Vitamin A which is is important in maintaining healthy skin, a functioning immune system, and eye health.
      A deficiency in vitamin A can cause hair loss, skin problems, dry eyes and an increased risk of infections.
      The recommended daily intake for vitamin A is 750µg and consuming two eggs daily delivers 14 percent of this.

8 - Eat organic or free range eggs. Speciality eggs (organic or free range, laid by hens raised on pasture and/or fed omega-3
      enriched feeds) provide 225mg of Omega-3 fatty acids, which help prevent osteoporosis and Alzheimer's. Omega-3 fatty acids
      are also known to reduce blood levels of triglycerides, a well known risk factor for heart disease. Studies show that consuming
      omega-3 enriched eggs is a very effective way to lower blood triglycerides. In one study, eating just five omega-3 enriched eggs
      per week for three weeks reduced triglycerides by 16 -18% (click on the eggs for more info).
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9
Eggs contain Lutein and Zeaxanthin. One of the consequences of aging is that eyesight tends to get worse. There are several
     nutrients that help counteract some of the degenerative processes that can affect our eyes such as macular degeneration. Two of
     these are called lutein and zeaxanthin. They are powerful antioxidants that accumulate in the retina of the eye.
     (click on the eggs for more info).
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     Studies show that consuming adequate amounts of these nutrients can significantly reduce the risk of cataracts and macular
     degeneration, two very common eye disorders. Egg yolks contain large amounts of both lutein and zeaxanthin. In one controlled
     study, eating just 1.3 egg yolks per day for 4.5 weeks increased blood levels of lutein by 28-50% and zeaxanthin by 114-142%.
     (click on the egg for more info). 
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10 - Regularly eating eggs may promote weight loss. Eggs are incredibly filling. They are a high-protein food, and protein is, by
       far, the most satiating macronutrient. Eggs score high on a scale called the satiety index, which measures the ability of foods to
       cause feelings of fullness and reduce later calorie intake. In one study of 30 overweight women, eating eggs instead of bagels for
       breakfast increased feelings of fullness and made them automatically eat fewer calories for the next 36 hours.
       (click on the egg for more info). 
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       In another study, replacing a bagel breakfast with an egg breakfast caused significant weight loss over a period of eight weeks
       (click on the egg for more info). 
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      Conclusion:
     
Eggs are among the most nutritious foods you can find, providing virtually all the vitamins and minerals you need. To top things off, eggs
      are cheap, taste awesome and go with almost any food. They really are an exceptional superfood!

      Vitamins in an egg:

Vitamin Per Medium Sized Egg (58g) % NRV* Per 100g** (content of 2 medium eggs) % NRV*
Vitamin A 64mcg 8% 126mcg 16%
Vitamin D 1.6mcg 32% 3.2mcg 63%**
Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) 0.25mg 18% 0.5mg 36%
Vitamin B12 1.4mcg 56% 2.7mcg 108%
Folate 24mcg 12% 47mcg 24%
Biotin 10mcg 20% 20mcg 39%
Pantothenic acid 0.7mg 12% 1.4mg 23%
Choline 144mg 36%*** 285mg 71%***


      Minerals in an egg:

Mineral Per Medium Sized Egg (58g) % NRV* Per 100g** (content of 2 medium eggs) % NRV*
Phosphorus 91mg 13% 179mg 26%
Iodine 25mcg 17% 50mcg 34%
Selenium 12mcg 22% 23mcg 42%

      *NRV (Nutrient Reference Value) - used for labelling in the UK and throughout Europe (European Parliament and Council (2011) Regulation No 1169/2011 on the
       provision of food information to consumers).

      **Based on the EU labelling NRV of 5mcg vitamin D. In the UK, a reference nutrient intake (RNI) of 10mcg of vitamin D per day is now recommended for everyone in the
        population over 4 years of age (http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/vitamins-minerals/Pages/Vitamin-D.aspx (link is external)). Two medium eggs would provide about one
        third (32%) of this amount.

      ***Adequate Intake (AI) - 400mg per day for adults (European Food Safety Authority 2016)

      Source, Department of Health (2013) and Finglas PM et al. (2015) McCance and Widdowson's The Composition of Foods, Seventh summary edition. Cambridge:
      Royal Society of Chemistry.

      Additional sources for this article: National Centre for Biotechnology Information / National Library of Medicine (USA). ScienceDirect ® (a registered trademark of
      Elsevier B.V.). Healthline Media (a Red Ventures Company)